RoadBikeReview.com's Forum Archives - General


Archive Home >> General(1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 )


advice/how-to for driving the SAG vehicle on group rides(6 posts)

advice/how-to for driving the SAG vehicle on group ridesHaiku d'état
Jun 27, 2001 7:37 AM
have any? what are the rules of etiquette for SAG drivers, where do they position behind/ahead of the pack, on hills, etc.?

have a roof rack with three trays and a trunk rack that carries a couple bikes..fair+ mechanical skills and alot of patience. what are the "rules" of driving the sag wagon (vehicle), suggestions, etc.? have never done it before, but after an incident on last weekend's club ride, there is discussion of a SAG or sweep vehicle on more populated club rides.

and...how many of you ride in clubs/teams that have SAGd group rides versus "event" rides?

thanks, all!
Sag wagon etiquetteCima Coppi
Jun 27, 2001 8:08 AM
A sag wagon should be driven behind the group and can be close to the group on climbs, or if the group is riding slow. Give yourself good distance back from the group on descents. Since the sag wagon will be driving much slower than normal motor traffice, ALWAYS have on your hazard lights to warn traffic coming up from behind of your presence and the cyclists presence. Also, drive as far right on the road as possible, even on the shoulder.

Obviously, keep a good tool kit, pump, and spare tubes in the vehicle. A cooler for water and food is a good idea, and keep a well stocked first-aid kit on hand.
Sag ettiquite, moreMrCelloBoy
Jun 27, 2001 9:02 AM
I don't totally agree with Cimo. I lead out the riders during the Terrible Two event in Santa Rosa, CA each year. I'm tripping traffic signals ahead of the riders as we go through the city at the start of the ride, then I leapfrog ahead a few miles, then waiting for the faster cyclists pass me. I only use the emergency flashers periodically as I feel it's appropriate and I suspect I'd be pulled over by a cop if I had them on constantly. The event is not a "race".
I do carry some of the gear as noted by Cimo. I use caution when passing groups of cyclists.
Sag ettiquite, moreMrCelloBoy
Jun 27, 2001 9:03 AM
I don't totally agree with all of Cimo's points. I lead out the riders during the Terrible Two event in Santa Rosa, CA each year. I'm tripping traffic signals ahead of the riders as we go through the city at the start of the ride, then I leapfrog ahead a few miles, then waiting for the faster cyclists pass me. I only use the emergency flashers periodically as I feel it's appropriate and I suspect I'd be pulled over by a cop if I had them on constantly. The event is not a "race".
I do carry some of the gear as noted by Cimo. I use caution when passing groups of cyclists.
Depends on a few factors...biknben
Jun 27, 2001 10:56 AM
I attempted a double century a few years ago. Unfortunately, I didn't have a sag. That's why I used the word "attempted". I was among other riders who were riding with a sag. Here's what I saw and my thoughts. During the beginning of the ride the sag would go ahead as many as ten miles ahead and leap frog the group. Early in the ride everyone is feeling good and doesn't need much support. Later in the ride the sag wagon would stay closer. When the road was wide enough the wagon would follow behind. In this case they would put their flashers on. They also typically put a sign on the back of the vehicle warning motorists that cyclist were ahead.

I think the leap frog method is a good idea. Each time they pass each other they would replenish supplies. A sag traveling behind the riders on a narrow road can really get motorists fired up. May be best to go ahead until the road offers more room to trail the group.

One very important thing. Don't forgt about the sag driver. Driving at 20 mph for hours can be as tiring as riding. The leap frog method will offer breaks for the driver to get out and stretch their legs.
good info. thanks, all! will heed your advice. NMHaiku d'état
Jun 27, 2001 2:33 PM