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The Hour Record--What are the current rules?(17 posts)

The Hour Record--What are the current rules?SimpleGreen
Jun 15, 2001 8:45 AM
I've heard that the hour record now must be done using a bike with box section rims and no aerobars. Are there any other rules, such as elevation requirements or bike design or wheel size?

SimpleGreen

PS Olano's going for it soon. Good luck to the guy!
Olano backed outpeloton
Jun 15, 2001 9:10 AM
Olano backed out of his planned attempt that he had scheduled. His doctors said that he still had an elevated level of lactic acid in his body from the Giro, and that his attempt at the record wouldn't be possible until his body had recovered. I think it's going to be a tough record to beat. Boardman planned specifically his late season to do it, and still barely slid in ahead of Merckx. Shows how strong Eddy was.
Rules, rules, rules!!Cima Coppi
Jun 15, 2001 9:43 AM
I have mixed feelings about about UCI requiring a specific bicycle for use in the hour record. On the one hand, its obvious modern technology and aerodynamics built into a bicycle will allow a rider to ride faster. This has not seemed to stop other sports from adopting new technology to help in record setting(i.e. auto-racing, skiing, etc).

On the otherhand, sports like running, and maybe even speed skating, have proven that strength evolution in the body has allowed for records to continue to be broken on what has been a fairly level playing field since the 19th Century (with the exception of shoe technology which does not play into aerodynamics at all).

Of course, the sports science has played a major role in past 25 years in researching ways to make the athelete stronger, faster, better.

Any thoughts on this??
I like the two sets....Len J
Jun 15, 2001 9:50 AM
It gives a good comparison to history, while shoeing the impacts of technology. The only thing it removes is the oponion. (:-))
AgreeLazy
Jun 15, 2001 10:13 AM
I think there is definitely a place for both records. This is especially the case with our sport. Since cycling is so long on tradition, it seems only fair to have the "unaided by modern technology" record. In the same breath, cycling is so dependent on technology that it would be short-sighted (that hyphen belongs there doesn't it Nige? ;-)) and silly to discount the contribution that technology has made to the sport.

After all is said and done, it amazes me that it has been such a struggle to surpass the record set by his cannibalness over 30 years ago. Especially in light of all the scientific advances in exercise science in the last couple of decades.
Eddy's bike was illegal!peloton
Jun 15, 2001 10:21 AM
The bike that Eddy used to break the hour record used every technological improvement that was availible at the time. The wheelset was scary light, with sections carved out of the rim between the spokes. In the new UCI rules for bikes that are able to be used in hour record attempts show that Eddy's bike was also under the minimum weight limit allowed by today's riders. And surely the bike that Eddy used gave him an advantage over the riders that came before him in breaking the record. He used technology the same way that people like Moser and Boardman did after him. It's a natural progression. And just like Eddy's bike gave him an advantage over those who came before, today's bikes are better still- even in full compliance of UCI regulations for 'traditional bikes'. The biggest improvement would be in the bearings of the wheels. Bearings today run much more smooth, and are faster than anything Eddy had at his disposal. It's still an apples to oranges comparison. Using technology is a natural progression. It takes away from the achievements of the men who broke the record over the past two decades to change the rules now. With the subtle improvements in even a 'traditional' bike, it still isn't much of a comparison.

Sport science is also an important factor in what athletes are able to do today. Training in years past relied a lot on tradition, and not a lot of it was grounded in science. When riders did things in years past, it came form inspiration and a natural ablility to do what they did. Today it comes from inspiration, natural ability, and the team of physiologists that have planned the athlete's entire life to come together for particular events. Science is a powerful tool in maximizing the ability of a rider. Today, a rider with less natural ability than Eddy could actually go faster than Eddy ever did because of advanced training techniques.

Eddy didn't have sport science. Eddy didn't have new technology. We will also know things in the future that today's athletes don't have. Records are made to be broken. And they will as we get smarter, regardless if athletes are equally talented as their predecesors. The only comparison that can be made is to show how good some of the athletes gone by were when their achievments are still looked at today with reverence despite our advancements.
Eddy's bike was illegal!Cima Coppi
Jun 15, 2001 10:36 AM
Your statement is flawed!! You say in the first paragraph that Eddy had special wheels and a lighter bike than other racers during the time. Yet in the last paragraph you state "Eddy didn't have new technology". Which was it?? According to you writing, I'd say Eddy did have access to new technology available at the time.

What this really seems to be is UCI's blindness to the past and present. If the governing body of cycling at the time Eddy rode the Hour allowed him to use all available technology at the time, then shouldn't UCI allow the current riders to do the same?

Here's another option. UCI should build an "Hour Record" bicycle. It should be built by one manufacturer, with one tubeset, have one gear ratio, one set of wheels, etc. Each rider who wants to try to break the record will use only this bike. They will only be allowed to change the size of the frame to fit the rider.

Does this then level the playing field for the current and future riders?
clarificationpeloton
Jun 15, 2001 10:41 AM
Eddy's bike was illegal by today's UCI standards by it's weight. It weighed less than what is currently legal.

Eddy didn't have access to today's technology on said 'traditional bikes' in relation to how far bearing technology has come. Bearings in the wheels and bottom bracket today are far smoother and faster than anything Eddy had access to.

It just goes to show that it is an apples to oranges comparison. On one hand, Eddy's bike was too light for today. On the other hand, his bearings created far more drag than the bikes allowed today.

I think it is silly to try to re-create the hour record. There will never be a fair comparison. Too many variables.
clarificationpeloton
Jun 15, 2001 10:44 AM
Eddy's bike was illegal by today's UCI standards by it's weight. It weighed less than what is currently legal.

Eddy didn't have access to today's technology on said 'traditional bikes' in relation to how far bearing technology has come. Bearings in the wheels and bottom bracket today are far smoother and faster than anything Eddy had access to.

Third, Eddy used all the technolgy he had at the time to beat those who came before him. You can't compare his record to his predicesors. You also can't compare the technology he had at the time, to that of today. Using technology is a natural progression. Eddy did it. And it continues today.

It just goes to show that it is an apples to oranges comparison. On one hand, Eddy's bike was too light for today. On the other hand, his bearings created far more drag than the bikes allowed today.

I think it is silly to try to re-create the hour record. There will never be a fair comparison. Too many variables.
hour record/speed skatingmilsk88
Jun 15, 2001 12:28 PM
Previously someone said that there have not been any advances in speed skating. WRONG! Remember in the '98 Olympics, the speed skaters started using a new type of skates with a blade that wasonly attached to the toe of the skate and pivoted on a joint.
Eddy's vs. Boardman's hour recordmilsk88
Jun 15, 2001 12:39 PM
Boardman currently holds the hour record and the "hour performance" (record set on a superbike). When Eddy set the record, he did not train as much as Boardman, but he set the record in Mexico City where the air is much thinner, thus providing less air resistence than in Manchester. Also, Boardman set the record at the very end of his career, while in bad form because of a bone disease. I think that if Chris had gone for the record back in '96 on a standard bike, he would have smashed Eddy's origional record.
hour record/speed skatingCima Coppi
Jun 15, 2001 1:53 PM
How significant was the time/speed gain due to the new skate blade?
One thing they keep forgetting ....Brian C.
Jun 15, 2001 12:29 PM
You can't uninvent speed.
They've been trying to do it in auto racing for years. Change the tires here, modify the body cowling there. These rules changes might work for a while, but gradually the speeds keep creeping back.
I think any guy (or gal) who can crank his legs the farthest in one hour should hold the record - regardless of the bike.
The Babe vs. Roger Marisjaybird
Jun 15, 2001 12:55 PM
This is the same debate that people were having in '61 when Roger maris hit 61hrs. it was still in the regular season but was in 1 more game than the Babe. Maguire was also taking some supplements/drugs (these same drugs are illegal in the UCI)when he broke that record...

Records are made to be broken. speed is speed. I think technology is our friend even though I ride only steel and Campy. Eddy used every bit of technology that was available to him at the time, so did the babe, maris and maguire.
Speed record? We don't need no steenkin' rules!mr tornado head
Jun 16, 2001 9:24 PM
OK, so we can go like this;

a) Like an earlier poster said, same bike manufacturer, same components, same tires, etc. Similiar to IROC. The machines are identical, it's now up to the rider.

-or-

b) Fling the door wide open. Hell, 15 years ago a sub-5 second Funny car was unheard of. Now it's par for the course. Damn the torpedos, now it's a whole team/builder/rider/technology event.

In either event, trying to "freeze" standards to an arbitrary moment in time is just ludicrous. Decathaletes don't have to use the same shoes Bruce Jenner used, do they?

My hat's still off to Eddy, Boardman, and anyone who has the strength to compete at this level. Just wuld like the UCI to get it's head out of it's ... ah, sand.
First Rule: Nobody talks about the Hour Recordmr_spin
Jun 15, 2001 4:31 PM
Check out this site: http://ida1.physik.uni-siegen.de/menn/ucirules.htm
"and no one expects the Spanish Inquisition" (nm)Len J
Jun 15, 2001 6:37 PM