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who takes time to give a wave?(27 posts)

who takes time to give a wave?got2ryd
Jun 8, 2001 5:11 AM
im newly back into road riding. ive been in the woods for years racing around on my mtb. just an observation here in northern vt is that the roadies seem less friendly, for lack of a better word. i would say that less than half of other road riders i wave to wave back. are they just too focused and dont see me? are they afraid to take their left hand off of the bar and give a wave? anyone else try to be friendly and wave out there? is waving considered to be fred? just curious here in vt!
Me...PsyDoc
Jun 8, 2001 5:44 AM
I will wave at other riders or joggers, etc. or give them a "head nod." I have waved at other riders and some ignore it and others respond. I typically do not get offended if a rider does not acknowledge the wave. Why? I have been riding and have been to frick'n exhausted to take my hand off the bars to wave at someone who has waved at me. On one particular occasion, I did give a pathetic attempt at a head nod, though.
re: who takes time to give a wave?mackgoo
Jun 8, 2001 6:00 AM
I can't always take my hand of and wave. I always make a point to verbaly greet my fellow riders.
I do but ...Humma Hah
Jun 8, 2001 6:03 AM
... since I ride a cruiser, my bike is slow, uncommonly stable, and almost impervious to road conditions.

Roadies' wheels are highly sensitive to rough pavement and glass. Even a large piece of gravel can cause a pinch flat. And at speeds which may average 25 mph, constantly looking for fairly small debris does require a degree of focus. You can also bet that the folks moving at that clip have serious training goals. It is not uncommon for roadies to tune out all but a strip of pavement a couple of meters wide straight ahead of them (actually, be honest, a MTBer cruising downhill on singletrack is pretty focussed, too, for pretty much the same reasons).

I think, once you catch a roadie stopped, they will turn out to be as friendly, or more, than MTBers. And if you encounter one going your way who is on a recovery ride or a just-for-fun outing, they'll ride with you and chat.
I try to but ...bianchi boy
Jun 8, 2001 6:32 AM
I don't take offense at bikers who don't wave. As HH so eloquently pointed out, roadies are often so focused on the road ahead that they may not notice other bikers or may not want to take their hands off the bars. I usually nod or give a finger wave. If you want to socialize with other roadies, go on some group rides with local bike clubs. You'll find plenty of friendly folks.
WAVER...AD14
Jun 8, 2001 7:36 AM
I try to wave at everyone. Just yesterday it cost me. I picked up some glass and had my first flat of the year. I will still wave, I even give bikers the thumbs up when driving by in a car-corny I guess.
My new theory about "why roadies don't wave" is that, heck,bill
Jun 8, 2001 8:37 AM
no one else much waves, either. I was out this a.m. and damn glad to be (sun rising over the Potomac River, silhouette of the Capitol dome, Washington Monument, skullers on the river, occasional goose or heron in the water), and smiling goofily at everyone I passed, jogger, biker, whatever. Hardly any response from anyone. Now, if the sight of this 42 yr old lycra-clad sweaty lawyer grinning at you at 6:30 am doesn't make you want to smile a little, you don't know comedy. But, about the only response I got from anyone was from a couple of Hispanic guys pedaling to work. Everyone else was too focused.
I think that you just take it more personally from roadies, because they're supposed to be kindred spirits or something.
The Hispanic Guys Riding To Work....Greg Taylor
Jun 8, 2001 8:59 AM
...are always friendly has hell. "Hola, amigo" gets a smile.

This morning was awesome, wasn't it? We had a gang of 4 ripping it up through Old Town, picked up another rider just past the Airport, and had it turned up for our usual sprint to the 14th Street Bridge. Weather was perfect, not too many joggers, and sliding into a weekend to boot!

We really should get the Washington DC area folks together for a ride. Or...is anyone out there doing Bike Virginia?
another DC localDuane Gran
Jun 8, 2001 9:44 AM
Good suggestion Greg. I'm not familiar with Bike Virginia, but if it doesn't conflict with a race I would be interested in hanging with some other RBR folks.

As for the topic, please allot some time for a wave back. I try to be polite (when I'm not doing a serious workout) but sometimes the wave occurs 10 feet in front me. That gives a fraction of a second for me to reciprocate. I would hate for everyone to think I'm a jerk because I don't have super human reflexes. Also, sometimes people didn't see the original gesture. In short, it is safer to assume that people didn't see you wave or had a good reason not to wave back.

Personally, I don't initiate a wave very often, but then there are cyclists all over the place out here. However, I do wave to cyclists wearing local team jerseys. I hope that doesn't make me an elitest snob to only wave to the local racing crowd.*

* note that I did wave to team Mercury-Viatel when I saw them on a training ride last week, so I wave to non-local racers too. :)
Bike Virginia is that multi-day extravaganza through the Bluebill
Jun 8, 2001 10:06 AM
Ridge, isn't it? Umm, won't be getting my ticket punched for that. For about thirty-six hours, I was planning on doing the Aids Ride this year (had almost $1,000 raised), but I was informed that this was not to be this year. Maybe next.
Do you ride with a club? When do you ride? From where? How far/long? What's your typical pace? I'm looking to hook up with some guys, although, with family commitments paramount on the weekend, and timing being everything, it's hard to make much of a commitment to a club. I typically jet out for a ride before the littl'uns are up; get back as they're maybe wiping some pancake syrup off their faces. I generally can get out for several hours, go for twenty to forty-five miles or so, depending on how much time I have, at about a 17-18 mph pace (by the computer, solo). I have ridden with guys traveling in a pack at 20-24, which I've had no problem maintaining.
A "Club" May Be Stretching It A Bit.Greg Taylor
Jun 8, 2001 11:17 AM
There is a group of us that ride from Fort Hunt Park (off of the GW Parkway, near Mt. Vernon) early on Sunday mornings. It can be a little hit-or-miss, but there is usually someone there to go with. We usually circulate an e-mail early in the week to see who will be there so there are no surprises, or folks can make other plans.

Our "usual" ride is down to Mason Neck Park (near Pohick and Gunston Hall) via Fort Belvoir. From Ft. Hunt Park, it is about a 50 mile loop, with some decent hills thrown in. A good ride will snag close to a 19 mph average. We aren't cycling gods, but we don't hang around. We have other routes out to Clifton Va. and over in Maryland (near Indian Head), with a couple of us doing the occasional mountain bike race. We've got 11 (including kids on tandems, etc.) doing Bike Va. this year.

Where are you riding?
I live in north Arlington, near the Custis Trail, which runsbill
Jun 8, 2001 11:46 AM
along 66 (right near Arlington Hospital). From the Custis Trail, I can go hook up with the W&OD and go west or go towards Rosslyn and go to Alexandria (occasionally all the way to Mount Vernon -- 45 mile out and back total), or cross the Potomac through Georgetown and go to Bethesda on the Capital Crescent trail or go up through Rock Creek Park. Being a weenie, I tend to stay on the trails when I leave from my house and reserve my road riding for when I get out of town a bit, like, when the wife is visiting my in-laws in Connecticut. I love the road, though, and I look forward to it.
What time do you all hook up Sunday a.m.? That's usually my time to ride on the weekends, although my wife has found religion lately, and I get in trouble if I interfere with church. If I can get her to go on Saturday nights (Catholics can do that), I'm good to go and can get out for three hours or so.
I know exactly where Fort Hunt Park is. Actually, to do some faster loops where traffic isn't an issue, I've ridden around the park. Not bad.
I sent you an e-mail - we can continue this off-line (NM)Greg Taylor
Jun 8, 2001 2:21 PM
I also wave at the localsnotes_clp
Jun 8, 2001 7:03 AM
I wave at other roadies.. Also something else I do when I am out riding in the country is to wave at the locals.. The way I look at it is I never know when I or some other roadie might need to go knock on their door for some type of help. If nothing else maybe the next time they pass me in there farm truck they will give me more room.
wavermike mcmahon
Jun 8, 2001 7:04 AM
I wave to just about everyone I see on bikes: those decked out in full Postal regalia, kids on BMX bikes, the old lady on the 3-speed I see almost every morning, bus boys with polyester pants and the handlebars of their 10-speed turned up, parents on hybrids with the kid on the back, and almost everyone else on two wheels without a motor. If I get a wave back, I'm happy. If not, I don't lose any sleep over it.
re: who takes time to give a wave?Mel Erickson
Jun 8, 2001 7:20 AM
I almost always wave or nod or try and give some other acknowledgement to other riders. On occasion I may be so focused that I don't notice an oncoming rider 'til it's too late or they surprise me around a corner, but that's rare. I also wave at the farmers, gravel truck drivers, motorcyclists, runners etc. that I meet. Usually not regular motorists. Almost everyone I wave to or acknowledge gives me some form of acknowledgement back. The one finger salute is very popular in my area, it's a typical Norwegian thing.
re: who takes time to give a wave?dough
Jun 8, 2001 8:58 AM
Man, this is one thing that really get under my skin. I'm a MTB'er, runner, triathlete, and road biker. When I'm riding my MTB or when I'm running most people are very friendly and polite. They give you a "Good morning" or "How are you?" or at least a wave. However, when I'm out on my road bike I get ignored most of the time when I greet other riders. I don't buy the argument that they are too focused on their ride to notice you. That may happen occasionally but not practically every the darn time. I find that most of the time other roadies will look right at me and then turn thier head back to the front and totally ignore the fact that I waved and said hello! What's up with that? Would it just totally ruin a persons day to wave at fellow rider?
I have a polite motorists alsoDave Hickey
Jun 8, 2001 9:05 AM
I wave at all cyclists, but I also wave a polite motorists who wait for a safe time to pass. I'm happy to say, it happens alot.
Should say " I wave to polite motorists also"(nm)Dave Hickey
Jun 8, 2001 9:07 AM
nm
I think that's importantAlan B
Jun 8, 2001 10:13 AM
I always acknowledge a motorist who has noticed me and yielded to me, especially if I need to cut through lanes to avoid a freeway onramp or at an intersection. I think cyclist courtesy helps to encourage driver courtesy.
re: who takes time to give a wave?SteveS
Jun 8, 2001 9:06 AM
I wave or try to acknowledge virtually every rider that I see on the road. Since I have been associated with a very large bike club in the past, I know that the riders are friendly, however, I still have no answer as to why people who are friendly off the bike, oftentimes seem unable to respond to a greeting while on the bike.
I think Dave Hickey makes a good point.veloboy
Jun 8, 2001 9:19 AM
I take time to wave to motorists at stop signs etc. when they give me the right of way. I wave to people in their front yards as well as hikers and equestrians on the trail when riding my mtb. I look at it as good public relations. Cyclists get enough road rage as it is.

I understand that sometimes we get a little tired on a ride and don't have the energy or don't want to take our hands off the hoods to wave back (sometimes we don't want to show the others how fried we really are), but lets face it, a lot of roadies are a little uptight and elitist.

I have been riding a roadbike seriously for over ten years in the Philadelphia and surrounding area and that's pretty evident. All in all though cyclists are a pretty agreeable bunch. I also think most of the riders I run into in the woods are a little more approachable.

Just an observation over the years.
I'm a waver or a head nodder as well.boy nigel
Jun 8, 2001 9:25 AM
I'll always wave or nod my head visibly at people on bikes. Depending on their proximity, I'll do the same to runners, too. Not that I'm obsessed with this, but I believe there's a kind of "brother/sisterhood" among distance athletes. Being out there on the road can get lonely, and a quick, friendly greeting can help the situation a bit. Plus, we likely share similar circumstances (traffic, "getting away from it all," making time for this type of exercize, dedication, even money spent--with cyclists, at least). I like seeing others out there, and will also ask if everything's okay with someone who's stopped roadside for a reason or another (adjustment, flat tire, etc.).

If people don't respond, that's okay too. I'm greeting them because I want to; they need not respond (though many do in NY and NJ).

Good little post, there, got2ryd.

Nige
re: who takes time to give a wave?dough
Jun 8, 2001 10:01 AM
Man, this is one thing that really get under my skin. I'm a MTB'er, runner, triathlete, and road biker. When I'm riding my MTB or when I'm running most people are very friendly and polite. They give you a "Good morning" or "How are you?" or at least a wave. However, when I'm out on my road bike I get ignored most of the time when I greet other riders. I don't buy the argument that they are too focused on their ride to notice you. That may happen occasionally but not practically every the darn time. I find that most of the time other roadies will look right at me and then turn thier head back to the front and totally ignore the fact that I waved and said hello! What's up with that? Would it just totally ruin a persons day to wave at fellow rider?
I just smile, and nod sometimes casually ask128
Jun 8, 2001 10:01 AM
how they feel about foreign policy....
or
"Hi, Got a match?" They'll be thinking about allll day!

Seriously, I try to nod just for the camaraderie aspect of the thing...especially on desolate stretches. In the city, nothing really unless it's for communication, safety purposes; thank you's and stuff
Don't care if it's not returned...won't assume their intentions. But in closer quarters (city) I prefer thanks when I give way and stuff...

-RR
chill out about the wavingColnagoFE
Jun 8, 2001 10:03 AM
some people just want to focus and ride (not be a social butterly) or it may be dangerous for them to wave at that moment (I sometimes nod. still if I'm not cranking i try to wave though I don't really get all bent out of shape if someone doesn't wave back. do you wave at everyone when you drive your car to the market? not sure where all this "you gotta wave" stuff started. IMHO people make too big of a deal about it.
chill out about the wavingCima Coppi
Jun 8, 2001 10:47 AM
I agree here. I wave when I can, and I don't get pissed off when someone doesn't wave back. It all depends on the situation at hand, moods, etc. Sometimes, I can't wave if I'm in the middle of a fast interval, or descent. Staying upright is my primary focus.