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ANY DOUBLE CENTURY RIDERS OUT THERE?(7 posts)

ANY DOUBLE CENTURY RIDERS OUT THERE?MikeIndy
May 24, 2001 8:27 PM
Hello,

If you are a double century rider could you share your experiences? I am thinking of doing a double century this summer. I have done double centuries before.

Thanks
re: ANY DOUBLE CENTURY RIDERS OUT THERE?MikeIndy
May 24, 2001 8:31 PM
DISREGARD THIS POST. THE CORRECTED ONE IS BELOW. I HAVE NOT DONE A DOUBLE CENTURY BEFORE. I HAVE DONE CENTURIES
Yup!MrCelloBoy
May 24, 2001 11:48 PM
I've done six or seven since age 18. The last, (Terrible Two, 16,ooo' elevation gain) at age 44, was the "easiest".
The biggest difference between a DC and a Century is the increased hours in the saddle. My training for the TT was basically two months of increased length rides and a 3-day weekend about 2 weeks prior when I did a combined 220+ miles and 2000' more climbing than the one-day event. At that point I new I had it in the bag.

Go for it Mike! Don't get sucked into going out too fast the first half. It's very seductive to keep grabbing fast pacelines. Ride your own pace the first hundred and save your soul for the final half.
Eat and drink like you did on the Century.
The Daily Double.grz mnky
May 25, 2001 8:35 PM
The secret is in picking the right ride. If you want to do the bare minimum and complete 200 miles then make sure it's flat and calm winds. If you want to do something more challenging I'd say you need to be able to knock out a flat century pretty fast and a hilly one in a pretty respectable time. Then you need to try riding something a bit longer and harder. 125 to 150 miles with a bunch of climbing. Don't forget to factor in the heat - it changes everything. Taper the week before. Expect to be heavily fatigued the following week.

You really need to know your body, understand where your limits are and be disciplined enough to keep fueling and maintain a sustainable pace.

Try doing some middle distances like 125 to 150 miles - the ride doesn't really begin until you start the second century. Do some back to back 75 mile rides. Get a heart rate monitor so you know exactly what is sustainable. The temptation to go hard on the first 100 is pretty strong.
suggestionsfreespirit
May 25, 2001 7:27 AM
If you can comfortably ride a century, a double is doable. That's pretty much all there is to it. You just go further. Once your training has taken you to the point where you can reach equilibrium on the bike, not using more fuel or oxygen than you need to maintain the same pace, theoretically any distance is rideable. Eat and drink more than you think you need to, and monitor your heartrate and breathing closely to avoid overexertion.

One big suggestion. Start out and climb hills more slowly than you think you should on the first one. If you finish fresh, then you'll know for next time.
Ride within your limitsRoger
May 25, 2001 9:11 AM
don't try to hang with a fast group if it feels uncomfortable. The most important thing is to keep your body comfortable and always remember to eat and drink especially at the beginning because toward the end, it'll be harder to eat..

In addition, make sure your taking in sodium, as aweful as they might look pickles and V8 are great during double centurys.

Roger (did the davis double last weekend)
re: ANY DOUBLE CENTURY RIDERS OUT THERE?MikeC
May 26, 2001 9:41 AM
The other posts all have good advice. Here's my two cents' worth:
1) Gel rules! I can't believe what a difference eating a Gu every twenty to thirty miles (chased by a full bottle of water) makes. I feel great on that regimen. You might also want to save one with the caffeine shot for the last leg. 2) My feet tend to swell a little toward the end of a long ride. Find the right shoe/sock combination. 3) Spend as little time off the bike at the rest areas as you can. 4) Discipline yourself to change riding postion regularly. When you feel the ache, it's often too late! 5) Don't forget some kind of recovery plan afterward: Massage, bath, eat, re-hydrate, muscle recovery, etc. Good luck!