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Gearing for road racing(6 posts)

Gearing for road racingMichelle
May 15, 2001 11:39 AM
What are the most commonly used gearing ratios or stock cassettes for road racing bikes?

Ex. My bike is a 9-speed 12-23 with a 39-52 chainring

Thanks!
Michelle
That's fine for most racing.J.S.
May 15, 2001 11:47 AM
In fact you really wouldn't need much else unless you were doing the extremes. Either a very flat road race or criterium you could go to a 11-21 or 12-21 for closer gear ratios or for races with steep climbs a 12-25 or even 12-27 may be in order. But for probably 90% of the races you'll do a 12-23 is fine.
re: Gearing for road racingLarry Meade
May 15, 2001 11:52 AM
Generally, a road bike will come with a 39/53 front and 12-23 rear cassette. It is not uncommon to find 13-25 (9 speed), 12-25 (10 speed) or even 13-27 or 29 tooth cassettes. Usually these are not stock on a bike but can be found pretty easily. The 29 tooth that I am familiar with is made by Campy and requires that the rear derailleur be changed to the medium cage model. Shimano supposedly only goes up to 27 tooth in their road derailleurs but I have heard of some stretching that a bit. Personally, if I were going to go with a big cassette on a Shimano bike I would but a Deore XT or XTR derailleur to handle the shifting in back. I hope this helps....

Larry
Have to walk it up that hillBrian C.
May 15, 2001 12:34 PM
In otherwise flat to rolling countryside hereabouts, there's one mother of a mountain - actually, an escarpment with a 12-per-cent incline (so they say).
The gearing - Shimano 9-speed, 11/23 x 39/53, all Ultegra except for a Dura-ace derailleur - is okay for the drumlins and flatlands but that hill? Forget about it - I have to walk it.
Any suggestions on modifying the gears?
Or do you build up your quads?
Thanks
Have to walk it up that hillchrisbaby
May 16, 2001 7:43 AM
could this possibly be the Niagara Escarpment? I would try a 25 in that case. How long is the climb? Have you tried doing it by pedaling really slowly? That's how I do it and I am no Pantani/Simoni/Heras
Yes, it's the Niagara EscarpmentBrian C.
May 16, 2001 8:29 AM
It's a fairly short (half-mile) winding road up a section of the escarpment called Rattlesnake Point. I thought about my previous post and would venture that the angle is probably about 45 degrees. (Don't know how that 12 per cent figure previously mentioned got stuck my mind or its relevance.)
On a recent club ride, several folks were able to climb it all the way - some had triples, some haddoubles. I went just a couple hundred yards or so and had to give it up.
It made me wonder if the gear setup on the bike was not conducive to this type of climbing, or if it was me who doesn't have the right stuff.