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This Weekend's Project(10 posts)

This Weekend's Projecttriangleforge
Jul 1, 2003 9:42 AM
A frenzy of wheelbuilding & other assembly over the weekend resulted in this -- my former TT bike now reborn as a fixed gear. While this was intended to be done on the cheap with parts cannibalized from another fixie that's been doing the winter/fixed, summer/geared metamorphosis for a few years, it didn't turn out entirely that way. A picture at the bottom of this note, but what you may or may not be able to tell from the photo:

Frame -- late 80's (?) Cannondale, whenever they were doing those funky cantilevered rear triangles, nicely repainted.

Rear Hub -- White Industries "Eric's Eccentric" to go fixed in the 'dale's vertical dropouts. I'll post a review once I've got a few miles on it, but so far, so good.

Front Hub -- Phil High-flange track. I do plan to take this bike to T-town this year, but honestly, there's no real rational reason for it, since the bike's mainly for training & commuting. I just was standing there in the bike shop and rational thought just got rudely elbowed aside by slavering desire. It sure does make me smile to see it go round & round, though.

Rims & tires -- Velocity Deep-V, Conti Gatorskins in 25c for road riding, to take the edge off.

Crank -- DA 170mm, 42x16 gearing.

Other -- Thrush Muffler stickers on the top tube; for some reason, I started putting Woody Woodpecker, Thrush muffler, or Clay Smith Cams "Mr. Horsepower" stickers on my bikes years ago and it's become something of a habit.

Cheers!
Rear Hub & Wacky Dropoutstriangleforge
Jul 1, 2003 9:53 AM
A closer look at the White Industries hub in action. From this angle, you can't really see that it's offset forward & down, pretty much straight away from the camera. The offset lifts the rear end relative to the axle by almost a centimeter, and "shortens" the chainstays by probably 5mm.

I think I can feel the effect of the "shorter" chainstays, and I'm sure I notice the steeper head tube angle that results from lifting the rear. This bike always had nervous steering, but its now even more on edge. It's easy to get used to, though. The BB is a smidge higher as well, which should help pedal clearance.

To get the same chain tension with this gear combo & chain length, I can also have the offset forward & up, but that ends up almost directly in line with the chainstay and thus leaves maybe a millimeter of space between the brake bridge and the 25c rear tire.
Cool setupTig
Jul 1, 2003 11:33 AM
I like what you did with the hubs/wheels. I'm curious how the WI hub will work for you. I can see several other advantages like the simple adjustment after changing a cog or chain ring. Let us know more when you put a few more rides on the bike.

I had that model of Cannondale way back as well. I can't say it was the smoothest riding bike I ever had, but for shorter rides and racing, it was fine.
Great bike...Dave Hickey
Jul 1, 2003 10:19 AM
Please post an update on the White hub. I'd like to see how you like it after a few miles. Did you have to re-space it or did it come in 126mm(130mm)?
126mmtriangleforge
Jul 1, 2003 10:27 AM
White makes them in 126, 130 & 135mm flavors. I assume they use the same shell for the hub & vary the lenght of the axle stubs.

One issue I did have -- the hub shipped with hex screws that were too long and would bottom out in the axle before they clamped the dropout. If I'm right about the differences between the different hub spacings, I'd wager they'd work just fine in the 130 or 135 hubs, which likely have deeper holes. However, I just took a couple millimeters off each at the grinder, dressed the ends and cleaned the threads in a die, and it works just fine now.

Cheers!
re: This Weekend's Projectsnakedust
Jul 1, 2003 4:23 PM
very nice bike mate. especially like those velocity rims with the high flange front hub
I have been waiting for this, wi ec hubbuffalosorrow
Jul 2, 2003 3:31 AM
Is is threaded for both cog and lockring on both sides?
Can you install a freewheel and run a SS? With out a chain tensioner...
How much was the rear hub?
If I had know about this two years ago I would have gone this route on my custom singlespeed cyclocross, as opposed to horizontal drops and track hub re-spaced.
I almost want to buy a new cross race frame and set it up as a killer singlespeed.
Nice rims, how do you like them?Trevo
Jul 2, 2003 9:52 AM
Looking for a fast aero rim for my freewheel PhilWood hubs.
Hub & Rimstriangleforge
Jul 2, 2003 10:31 AM
You asked...

> Is is threaded for both cog and lockring on both sides?

It's set up for a lockring on one side, no lock on the other, which gets to your next question...

> Can you install a freewheel and run a SS? With out a chain tensioner...

Yes & Yes (yes, that is to say, you don't need a chain tensioner)

> How much was the rear hub?

A lot. It lists at $160 ($10 more than I spent on my favorite road race wheels, for goodness sake!).

> If I had know about this two years ago I would have gone this route on my custom singlespeed cyclocross, as opposed to horizontal drops and track hub re-spaced.
I almost want to buy a new cross race frame and set it up as a killer singlespeed.

Horizontal drops & a track or singlespeed hub still probably give you the most flexibility, especially if you want to run more than one different rear wheel. Still, if you've got a nice old frame with vertical dropouts that you want to run fixed, this is pretty much your only option.

As for the rims, the Velocity Deep Vs built up really nicely (deep section rims are always the easiest) and seem to ride very well. Other deep-section rims I've got (Mavic CXP33, Spinergy Rev-X and an old Specialized Tri-Spoke) all can be a handfull in a strong crosswind. I would expect the Deep V to be pretty similar to the CXP33, which really isn't bad so much as noticeable when the wind catches it. I've got quite a few miles on another Velocity Deep-V rim that's on my cyclocross mud/commuter wheels, and it's held up well to some pretty constant pounding. They aren't light, though -- I put one on a scale before I built it and remember being shocked at the weight -- somewhere in the 550-580 gram range, if I recall correctly. Just a tad heavier (by a good 80 grams) than the listed weights in the catalogs!

Cheers!
interestingTrevo
Jul 2, 2003 10:41 AM
Although I dont consider myself a weight weenie, I do watch the weight on my fixed gear Trek. Iam quite proud of the fact that its under 20 lb. And I dident even try to make it light! I was planning on building the 7speed freewheel PhilWood hubs onto a stronger rim for Touring and Cyclocross. Ill prolly go with something like a Velocity Razor or a Sun CR18.

Trevo