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Introducing myself and one of bikes(11 posts)

Introducing myself and one of bikesRon in NorCal
Jan 6, 2003 11:03 AM
I've been lurkying about for a while. I finally got a picture of my bike and thought I'd introduce myself.

I'm in the SF Bay Area (at the foot of Mt. Diablo). I've done 30 double centuries (on a Colnago OvalTitan) and I'm currently doing triathalons (on a Cervelo P3) in the Men 55-59 AG.

Let me introduce you to 'pinkie' as my cycling friends refer to my fixed gear. This is one of three bikes built by Brain Baylis in 2001. It could be the only customer requisitioned fixed gear road bikes he has built.

The bike is a 59cm with a 72.5° seat tube angle with relaxed steering tube angle. The tubing is vintage Reynolds 753 with double tappered seat stays, and Nervex lugs that Brian cut, carved, and extended. The wheels have Phil Wood hubs with the cranks (175), bb, and brakes being DuraAce. The saddle is a Brooks Swift. The rear is a flip/flop currently setup with 18/16 to compliment the 42 tooth chainring. (I use the 18 to go up Mt. Diablo and the 16 for going down.)

I've got around 3,000 miles and a max rpm of 188 on it since I put it together last spring.

This picture was taken yesterday. I haven't cleaned it up nice enough to take any closeups but when I do I'll share them. Brain did an excellant job and this is one sweet ride.
Welcome.............Dave Hickey
Jan 6, 2003 11:21 AM
Great looking bike. What do you think of the Reynolds 753? I'm looking at a restoration project and the frame is 753.
This bike has a plush rideRon in NorCal
Jan 6, 2003 11:39 AM
Brian Baylis was a frame builder and later foreman for Masi California back in the 70s. He hand fitted every miter with the utmost care. The tight miters and Nervex lugs added to the road geometry give the plush feel. I have no problems doing 40, 50, or 60 mile rides so the craftsmanship, frame design, and frame materials blend together to yeild an excellant 'steel' ride that does not fatique the rider. I was able to have the bike built with the 753 because Brian had a little held in his 'private' reserve.

It is my understanding (although I am easily misinformed and downright wrong from time to time) is that 753 is hard to get.
This bike has a plush ridefixedgearhead
Jan 6, 2003 2:26 PM
You are right. Reynolds 753 is no longer available as it has been superceeded by 853 which is enhanced by the welding process during assembly , or at least so says the official Reynolds web site. I have yet to ride any bike made of the higher number stuff from Reynolds, but I understand, from reports of people that have and compared the two, they can produce a very light weight frame which has as good a ride characteristics as the older 531 steel which was the benchmark of the industry for years. It should provide you with many years of great riding. I understand that it is a little more prone to getting dented if it is abused because it is thinner than the older 531.that was supposedly the reason they withdrew it and went with 853 Is that your understanding? Maybe it is just folk myth. Have you ridden any similar bike made of 531, and do you have a comparison?Let us know.

fixedgearhead
The last lugged steel bike I rodeRon in NorCal
Jan 6, 2003 6:25 PM
was back in the late 60s. It was a beautiful sapphire blue and white Peugot that cost me around $250 back then. It had chrome forks and chain stay, Campy componets including friction downtube shifters, Campy center pull brakes, aluminum rims with sewups. Squandered youth. I wish I had that bike back now.

Unfortunately I don't remember the ride quality. I rode it up Mt. Diablo every Saturday morning. Over Pleasant Hill Rd. back and forth to Lafayette for my after school job. I rode it one summer down and back to Yosemite after my Junior year of HS. I rode it through Zion, North Rim of the Grand Canyon, and Yellowstone. Wool jersey and shorts with a leather chamois, toe clips and shoes with a leather soles and no socks and a hair net.

Brian did warn me to take extra care of the frame so there maybe some truth to the easy denting.
This bike has a plush ridefixedgearhead
Jan 6, 2003 2:28 PM
You are right. Reynolds 753 is no longer available as it has been superceeded by 853 which is enhanced by the welding process during assembly , or at least so says the official Reynolds web site. I have yet to ride any bike made of the higher number stuff from Reynolds, but I understand, from reports of people that have and compared the two, they can produce a very light weight frame which has as good a ride characteristics as the older 531 steel which was the benchmark of the industry for years. It should provide you with many years of great riding. I understand that it is a little more prone to getting dented if it is abused because it is thinner than the older 531.That was supposedly the reason they withdrew it and went with 853 Is that your understanding? Maybe it is just folk myth. Have you ridden any similar bike made of 531, and do you have a comparison?Let us know.

fixedgearhead
re: Introducing myself and one of bikesfixedgearhead
Jan 6, 2003 11:28 AM
Ah! Mt Diablo. I lived in Walnut Creek for 13 years and used to ride Mt. Diablo regularly. The last 1/4 mile up to the observation tower was one of the steapest rides in the Bay Area. Brings back fond memories of pain and pleasure. Welcome to you. Nice looking ride.

fixedgearhead
re: Introducing myself and one of bikesRon in NorCal
Jan 6, 2003 11:41 AM
I was born and raised in Pleasant Hill. I'm currently living in Walnut Creek.

It is indeed a small world.
Hi Ron.look271
Jan 6, 2003 11:28 AM
That fixie makes my "beater" Nishiki look masculine! =)
Welcome aboard!
Hey, Ron... Welcome aboard!Tig
Jan 6, 2003 4:07 PM
No need to introduce ourselves to you since you've been lurking a while and have read our single speed babbling. It's such a fun and incredible way to ride, we just can't shut up about it! LOL

It is good to see more and more SS/fixed gear riders contributing their knowledge and experiences here. I consider any adult cyclist to be wiser than the average citizen, and a single speed rider a genius!

That's a wonderful bike you have there. It must have what I like to call a "magic carpet ride". Be sure to share some ride reports and tips with us in the future.
What a great photo!Oneheart
Jan 7, 2003 8:23 AM
Welcome to the site Ron. What a beautiful background, beatiful California day and to be out riding your fixed gear... is this Heaven?