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Sand on CX Course(4 posts)

Sand on CX Coursesuperdreadnought
Oct 24, 2003 12:12 PM
How do you deal with sand on the race course? Any recommendations?
re: Sand on CX CourseDwayne Barry
Oct 24, 2003 12:19 PM
If you're talking about volley ball court like sand:
Look for the line that usually develops, accelerate into it, don't stop pedaling because balance becomes more difficult and it's critical to maintain your momentum to get through it. Go straight, any kind of turning of the front wheel usually results in coming off.
Try not to go into the sand behind anyone if you can help bit, because if they have any problem, you can almost gurantee you're coming off as well.
I run 'em with my singlespeed..buffalosorrow
Oct 24, 2003 3:17 PM
..but my friend slightly wheelies into them settles back and pedals through, hes pretty good at it. A bit faster than me (but not on the last lap, typically).

What he claims you dont want to do, is sink your front end or "bog down", you'll never make it though if you have your weight in the front.

I personally pick a compact path, dismount, carry and take long strides, soft bike landing and re-mount. I have noticed in the past races I am equal (time-wise) to that of a meduim skilled sand rider, not to bad in my books.
re: Sand on CX Coursedlbcx
Oct 24, 2003 5:46 PM
Depends on the condition of the sand. Since my race was usually the third one of the day, the sand was pretty loose. Also, the course consisted of 50% sand. The worse part was the 100 meter runup in beach sand then to keep anyone from riding it, two barriers were put up. Then, there was a sand pit section at the end of a descent. The only way to get throuch was to lift the front end then as you started to lose momentum, start pedaling like crazy.
You can go to http://www.hanskellner.com/ to get an idea of what I'm talking about. Click on his video gallery link then go to the Surf City 2001 CX Race 2 videos.
This was the race where we start on foot rather than on the bike.