RoadBikeReview.com's Forum Archives - Cyclo-Cross


Archive Home >> Cyclo-Cross(1 2 3 )


bike for commuting/touring(8 posts)

bike for commuting/touringdissonance
Dec 18, 2001 1:06 AM
I've been looking into getting a cross bike for commuting/touring and maybe even a little cross if I can find the time. Things like fender/rack eyelets are mandatory, aluminum would be good given the amount of rain I endure. Of course, cheap is nice too.

While well versed in roadie and mtn, I've got nothing on cross. From what I can see, there's not much to choose from, which may be a good or a bad thing. I'm a pretty powerful rider, live for hills, and mashing big gears, so I'm guessing stuff like Sora isn't going to last that long with me. Other than that, though, I really have little clue what's good and what's not.

So far I'm thinking of either getting something specced with 105ish stuff, or getting one of the bikes with Sora and getting my shop do some upgrades. Any bikes out there that I should specifically stay away from? Bikes I should be looking hard at? I've got a general idea what I'm looking for, I just want to make sure I don't blow it.

Thanks
Surly Cross Checkclimbo
Dec 18, 2001 5:30 AM
pretty sure it has fender monuts and not many cross bikes do as they are not for touring. The Surly is a one fits all kinda bike. Alu? It's steel, use frame saver and you'll have no problems. Should be a comfortable ride too. This bike with 105 and a straight up wheelset could be around $1,000 or so, and will take some abuse.
re: bike for commuting/touringtriangleforge
Dec 18, 2001 7:14 AM
The Surly that climbo suggests is a good, solid, inexpensive frame that will do everything you want and more. Also check out steel frames like the Gunnar Crosshairs and the Waterford cross frames if you want something a little nicer & lighter. The Gunnar lists rack/fender mounts at the Schwab Cycles site, and I'd be shocked if Gunnar's "big brother" Waterford didn't spec them as well.

In aluminum, the Trek XO-1 is a good option, and I know it's got rack mounts on the rear; I'm not so sure about the fork. Does anyone with a Redline (good, inexpensive aluminum frames/forks) know if they're set up for fenders/racks? I wouldn't be surprised if they were.

If you're pretty confident about sizing, there are a lot of good deals to be had on the used market, especially now that the racing season is winding down -- lots of racers are selling bikes in hopes of upgrading, and at least as many would-be racers are realizing that yet another season has passed them by and the 'cross bike is just gathering dust. I know the VooDoo Wazoo that I ride (steel) has full fender/rack mounts on it, and cost me about $250 used (frame & fork), in great shape.

As for Sora vs. other Shimano gruppos, I'd just ride it until it wears out, then upgrade it.

Cheers!
BRAD
SomaBlair
Dec 18, 2001 10:00 AM
Consider Soma Cross, because it has full braze-ons on an affordable steel frame.

www.somafab.com
http://www.gotbike.com/somdoubcrosc.html
Surly trumps Somabn
Dec 18, 2001 10:49 AM
Surly has horizontal dropouts, for when you get the hankering for a little fixed gear riding. Price is about the same when you add in cost of fork and seatpost collar to Soma.
Soma and Surly closs but differentBlair
Dec 19, 2001 1:40 PM
Truly both great bikes, and each has a slightly different niche.

Surly MSRP $390 vs Soma $320 frame $80 fork
(soma uses a built-in seat post clamp vs surly's clamp on)

Surly has the advantage of running 45cc tires, I can't think of another bike that can run this big.
Surly has the single speed plus.
Surly has a great fork crown.
Surly has one paint color: green
Surly has straight gauge stays

Soma has the touring advantage of having braze-ons to mount a front rack.
Soma gives you a choice of orange or black
Soma is less common around here.
Soma has a reynolds 631 double butted main triangle and DB stays

Truly a close match with only a few of us able to discern the difference
The only way to make a mistake is to not get either.
Soma and Surly close but differentBlair
Dec 19, 2001 1:41 PM
Truly both great bikes, and each has a slightly different niche.

Surly MSRP $390 vs Soma $320 frame $80 fork
(soma uses a built-in seat post clamp vs surly's clamp on)

Surly has the advantage of running 45cc tires, I can't think of another bike that can run this big.
Surly has the single speed plus.
Surly has a great fork crown.
Surly has one paint color: green
Surly has straight gauge stays

Soma has the touring advantage of having braze-ons to mount a front rack.
Soma gives you a choice of orange or black
Soma is less common around here.
Soma has a reynolds 631 double butted main triangle and DB stays
Soma can run 38cc tires with fenders

Truly a close match with only a few of us able to discern the difference
The only way to make a mistake is to not get either.
Graham Weigh @ Deeside cycles UKbuffalosorrow
Dec 22, 2001 9:42 PM
I was looking for a second frame to use a single speed/ fix cross and commuter with the option to gear up if my main bike was damaged while racing. After looking long and hard, and eliminating aluminum frames I saw a few choices; Surly, a great tank but I wanted a straight fork; Lionsport, I have never seen one in person, website looks good; Lemond, great frame, components lack to say the least and no hoizontal drop-outs. Waterford and Gunnar where a hair out of my price range.
I came across Graham Weigh through Deeside cycles when my friend was looking to find a good deal on importing a Cinelli Starship. To make a long story short and massive problems with finding a Starship in Europe. We both ordered custom bikes.

-Graham Weigh Reynolds 531 TIG (the down tube is a tear drop
reynolds 853)
-Staight 1" fork
-Top routed cables
-Horizontal dropouts
-Rack eyelets on the rear
-Bottle mount on down tube
-Custom orange to black fade paint

The price was right. It took a while to build. The bike rides perfect. Only complaint is the paint might be thin for my harsh city riding. Service is an A++. I am very happy with my purchase!