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Handlebars keep heading south(6 posts)

Handlebars keep heading southbug753
Sep 12, 2001 8:35 PM
I just set up a cross bike, and I'm using a ITM Scatto bar with a TTT Forge Ahead stem. I'm running into a problem with the bars slowly slipping downwards when I hit rough stuff while ridding on the hoods. While the bar and stem are different brands they both have 25.8 mil clamps and I have degreesed both the clamp on the stem and the handlebar and even used a fine sand paper to make sure that the surfaces on the contact area between the bar and stem are clean yet the bars continue to slip (with less frequency then before). Has anyone else experiaced this with either of these to products or have any ideas.
thnx.
Bug man
GREASE IS YOUR FRIEND, NOT YOUR ENEMY!!!!!!APSBiker01
Sep 13, 2001 8:06 PM
Use grease, foo!

If you don't use grease, you risk cold-welding the stem to the bar, and you also decrease the chance that your bar will stay on! USE GREASE!

As a wise man once said, "There is no such thing as too much grease."
GREASE IS YOUR FRIEND, NOT YOUR ENEMY!!!!!!BAM
Sep 14, 2001 4:13 AM
If the bar is slipping then greasing is not the answer. Grease all bolts but the stem and bar intersection should be clean. How old is the bar and stem? Take a caliper check the bar where the stem clamps to it ( all the way around) to see if the bar is slightly ovalised if it is replace it. Are there any gouges in the bar from the stem? If so replace it. Is the stem clamp misshapened or damaged? If so replace it . OR take it to your LBS and let them figure it out. They should have other bars and stems in stock they can try with yours to help rule out problems with either. Grease can be an enemy if used in the WRONG place!
BAM
LBS Mechanic
GREASE IS YOUR FRIEND, NOT YOUR ENEMY!!!!!!APSBiker01
Sep 17, 2001 6:25 PM
I AM a LBS mechanic, and the way ALL the manuals and experts I've been around say is that you WANT to grease the handlebar-stem junction ESPECIALLY if one or both are made of ALUMINUM, because the ALUMINUM WILL SEIZE UP(NOT GOOD) if you don't grease it. However, you should take it to see your LBS, they CAN/WILL fix the problem, often for little or no charge if it isn't a monster problem.

Route 66 Bikes -- where I work!

Where do you work, BAM?
GREASE IS YOUR FRIEND, NOT YOUR ENEMY!!!!!!BAM
Sep 17, 2001 8:03 PM
I did not mean to insult you , but I have yet to see grease in this area do little more than make the problem worse. Putting grease in the stem/bar junction won`t make a slipping bar be any tighter. The problem has nothing to due with worry about this junction seizing/cold welding, but getting a tight fit. Even on road bikes that are ten to twenty years old it is easy to remove the bar from the stem. On the other hand a stem frozen within the headtube is a real bear to break free. What works in one instance won`t necessarily work in another. Every bike and customer is a new challenge, this is part of what makes being a mechanic worthwhile/interesting.

For the record I work at Exton Bicycles in Exton, PA with a second store , West Chester Bicycle Center in West Chester, PA . I`ve worked here for the last 8 yrs.

Brian Myers- Head mechanic/Exton Store Mgr.
GREASE IS YOUR FRIEND, NOT YOUR ENEMY!!!!!!bug753
Sep 18, 2001 8:06 PM
Hey Guys,
I appreciate the responces and do agree that grease is important, but I have to agree with Brian on this one. I wrenched for two years at Mt View in HR Oregon and have never heard of greasing the stem bar interface. Bolts of course, seatpost always, but I've never heard of putting grease on a bar and don't think I'd be willing to try it. Espically since the problem is a lack of friction to start with. But anyway I do believe I have the problem fixed, I swithed out the stem to a control tech and the bars havn't moved since. I don't know if TTT and ITM have different ideas of what 25.8 is or maybe having two polished aluminum surfaces together just didn't jibe. But anyhow thanks for the advice.

Later
Bug