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Deda 215 bar(15 posts)

Deda 215 barbw77
Dec 9, 2003 10:07 AM
I need to find a handlebar that will get my fingers closer to the brake levers from the drops. I have ITM Europa with Campy Ergo levers. The web page for the Deda 215 anatomic bar claims that this bar gets fingers 13mm closer than any other anatomic bend. Can anyone verify that?

I am also considering the Deda round shallow bar. I've never used a round bar, is it less comfortable in the drops than the anatomic?
re: Deda 215 barNessism
Dec 9, 2003 11:09 AM
I used a set of 215's for several years and never noticed any difference in the reach to the levers. Think about it for yourself, how is it that different bars can change the reach to the levers? They can't!

The only thing bars can control is the angle of your hands as they reach for the levers. In this regard, Deda bars position your hands in a good position. Downside though is that this position is not very comfortable to ride in.

So bottom line is that the Deda bars do position your hand in an advantageous position to reach the levers, but this position is not the most comfortable for riding (my opinion).

For a nice riding position while in the flats, check out the Ritchey bars. They have a horizontal oriented anatomic flat that is fairly comfortable (my opinion).

FYI, I have no personnel experience here but have read that Campy ergo levers have a longer reach than Shimano STI. Take it for what it's worth.

Good luck.

Ed
Post the rest. It was cut off. Thanks (nm)TFerguson
Dec 9, 2003 2:10 PM
I missed. C40's was cut off. (nm)TFerguson
Dec 9, 2003 2:13 PM
don't believe it, and a solution...C-40
Dec 9, 2003 11:40 AM
I've used the ITM Pro 220 anatomic (like Pro 260 and Millennium), Deda 215 and Easton EC-90 bars. I found little difference in the reach to the brake levers with any of them. I could barely get my middle finger around the lever, even without cycling gloves.

I recently changed to Salsa Poco bars which have a short reach to the brake hoods and a shallow drop, but the reach to the brake levers was no better.

I finally decided to fix the problem with a simple modification to the ergo levers. The following instructions detail how to greatly shorten the reach to the brake levers. The instructions were written with the "mechanically challenged" in mind:

I've got short fingers and always struggled to reach the brake levers with Campy Ergo levers. I tried several different bars, but found that none reduced the reach more than 3mm at best. I improved the situation by setting the brake cables fairly loose. This allows some movement of the lever, to get a better grasp, without creating any braking action. While this was an improvement, I found it uncomfortable to partially compress the levers for long periods as required on technical mountain descents. I've found a fairly easy method to solve this problem.

The Campy levers have a lot more travel than necessary to operate the brakes. Before starting this modification, adjust the brake cables so the levers are only 1/8" to 1/4" away from the bars with the brakes fully applied. Just don't set the cables so loose that the levers hit the bars and can't apply full braking power!

Campy brake levers use the quick release pin (in the lever) as a lever stop. To bring the levers closer to the bars, the area behind the pin-rest merely needs to be "built-up". I used 5-minute epoxy glue to build up the pin-rest area on the ergo lever body. Once this modification is done the new resting position will be the same as when the levers were compressed about 1/2 inch. If you object to the "look" of the lever with the top edge slightly protruding in front of the body, then don't consider this modification. Personally, I think most folks would have to look closely to notice the difference. For me, the improvement was well worth the effort and I don't object to the look of the lever in the resting position.

The required tools and materials to build-up the ergo lever body with epoxy are:

120 grit sandpaper, miniature sanding drum
acetone or lacquer thinner
masking tape
5-minute epoxy glue
toothpicks or jewelers screwdriver (to apply epoxy)
rags or paper towels
small electric drill or "Dremel" tool
single-edge razor blade, Xacto knife, or utility knife

1.
Push the brake release pin into the released position.

2.
Clean the area where the quick release pin rests with acetone to remove any dirt or grease.

3.
Place a small piece of masking tape on the brake lever to cover the area adjacent to the pin-rest, to avoid getting glue on the lever. Additional masking can be done on the lever body to prevent adhesive from contacting the lever body, if desired.

4.
Lightly sand the pin-rest area to provide a rough surface for good adhesion of the epoxy. This can be done by rolling up a small piece of 120-grit sandpaper to the approximate diameter of the pin and sanding by hand. The rolled-up sandpaper can also be placed in a drill to sand the area quickly (but gently). Those who own a Dremel tool may have a miniature sanding drum than would work even better. I also chose to drill a very shallow 1/16 inch hole in the center of the pin-rest area to create a "post" from epoxy that may improve adhesion of the built-up material. This may be overkill, but it was simple to do and only took about a minute.

5.
When all the above preparation is complete, the bike must be stood up so the pin-rest area is pointing straight up (if the ergo levers are mo
don't believe it, and a solution...bw77
Dec 9, 2003 1:08 PM
That's a creative idea to modify the lever.
But did you ever try a non-anatomic bar before you modified
the lever?
never used a round bar, but....C-40
Dec 9, 2003 3:39 PM
If you consider that the lever is always mounted to the front side of the bar, there's no way to get the lever much closer unless the bar is flatened out on the front side. If the angle of the entire brake hood is changed enough to help, it would be very uncomfortable when riding in the drops, since the top of the brake hood would be pointed down. For optimum comfort, the top of the brake hood should be horizontal or angles up a few degrees, but not downward.

I think you'll be disappointed with a round bar, but feel free to try it.
I've been modifying Ultegras and agree exactly with 3mm...TFerguson
Dec 9, 2003 2:09 PM
I switched to Shimano from Record/Chorus because I couldn't figure out how to modify the Campy. Good work!!
TF
oops, didn't post completelyC-40
Dec 9, 2003 3:42 PM
The required tools and materials to build-up the ergo lever body with epoxy are:

120 grit sandpaper, miniature sanding drum
acetone or lacquer thinner
masking tape
5-minute epoxy glue
toothpicks or jewelers screwdriver (to apply epoxy)
rags or paper towels
small electric drill or "Dremel" tool
single-edge razor blade, Xacto knife, or utility knife

1.
Push the brake release pin into the released position.

2.
Clean the area where the quick release pin rests with acetone to remove any dirt or grease.

3.
Place a small piece of masking tape on the brake lever to cover the area adjacent to the pin-rest, to avoid getting glue on the lever. Additional masking can be done on the lever body to prevent adhesive from contacting the lever body, if desired.

4.
Lightly sand the pin-rest area to provide a rough surface for good adhesion of the epoxy. This can be done by rolling up a small piece of 120-grit sandpaper to the approximate diameter of the pin and sanding by hand. The rolled-up sandpaper can also be placed in a drill to sand the area quickly (but gently). Those who own a Dremel tool may have a miniature sanding drum than would work even better. I also chose to drill a very shallow 1/16 inch hole in the center of the pin-rest area to create a "post" from epoxy that may improve adhesion of the built-up material. This may be overkill, but it was simple to do and only took about a minute.

5.
When all the above preparation is complete, the bike must be stood up so the pin-rest area is pointing straight up (if the ergo levers are mounted on the bike). If the bike is mounted in a workstand , this is easy.

6.
Mix a small amount of 5-minute epoxy and apply a large "drop" to the bottom of each of the pin-rest areas. Use a toothpick or jewelers screwdriver to apply the glue. Try to keep the glue away from the brake lever, but if it flows into it, don't worry. The masking tape on the brake lever will prevent the glue from attaching to the lever. With 5-minute glue you have to work quickly or the glue will get tacky and string from the applicator, creating a mess. Do not allow glue to run onto the outside of the lever body. If it does, use a rag wetted with a small amount of acetone to wipe it off before it hardens.

7.
After the glue has hardened (at least 30 minutes) check to see if glue appears stuck to the masking tape on the brake levers, or has run into the small gap between the lever and the body. If it has, use an Xacto knife or double edge razor blade to carefully cut a gap between the lever and the body. It's best to do this before the glue sets really hard. When this is complete, the brake lever should be free to move without disturbing the built-up epoxy on the pin-rest.

8.
After the epoxy has cured more completely (2 hours), push the brake release pin into it's normal position and check the lever position when at rest. If enough epoxy was applied the lever should protrude in front of the lever body (where "10 SPEED" or "CARBON-BB SYSTEM" is written). Measuring from the front of the lever body to the front edge of the brake lever, the protrusion should be much more than 1/8 inch, otherwise the total travel of the brake lever will be reduced too much. This amount reduces the reach to the brake lever from the drops by about 1/2 inch. The amount of lever protrusion can be much less if a full 1/2 inch reduction in reach is not needed. I use a 1-inch diameter dowel rod as a gage to place between the bars and the shift lever. This is the absolute minimum distance that I would recommend to leave sufficient travel for proper brake operation. If too little epoxy was applied, the levers may not be as close to the bars as desired. If this is the case, repeat steps 4-7 to add thickness. If too much epoxy was applied, use the rolled sandpaper, mounted in the drill, or a minia
Still not all of it !!!!C-40
Dec 9, 2003 5:12 PM
I'll post a new message and see if I can get it all!
As for your original question...TFerguson
Dec 9, 2003 2:16 PM
I don't know who wrote that, but I doubt if it was Deda. What they are refering to is the "reach" of the bar which is the distance that the front of the curve is foreward from the tops. It makes the levers closer to you, but not closer to your hands.
TF
As for your original question...bw77
Dec 9, 2003 4:16 PM
Here is the quote from their description of the 215 bar.
Now I'm not sure what they mean with the 13mm???
-------------------------------------
Aluminium alloy handlebar, 7075 T6 triple butted 1,5 - 1,3 - 1,2 K.E.T. (Kinetic Energy Treatment) treated. In the middle part thickness is 1,5 mm and it gradually becomes 1,3 mm in the lateral part, while it is steadily 1,2 mm in the bent portion. Deda Elementi design an "Deda anatomic" version shape each of its bends with an easier gripping thanks to a distance which is 13 mm shorter than all other bends on the market. The "215" handlebar is available in three different shapes and two different anodized colors. Width: 42-43-44-46cm (outside-outside
re: Deda 215 baranzoni
Dec 11, 2003 1:29 AM
I have the 215 shallow. I was going for the anatomic, but due to my LBS, a shallow it was! I have to say that it is a cool bar which is somewhat higher in the drops tha other bars, 1 cm or so. Therefore you may position the bars somewhat lower than usual if you like a lower top position.
It may take sometime to get used to the round bend, but I like it and will never go back to anatomic (at least not the extreme ones). Deda's look nice though, but shallow is the classic one and looks great.
Reach to the levers seems to be the same.
re: Deda 215 bartarwheel
Dec 11, 2003 7:45 AM
You can find the reach and drop for a number of bars at www.bikeusa.com. I've been using Ritchey WCS and Pro bars for a couple years and really like the anatomic shape and shallow drop. The Deda 215 Shallow has even less drop (you have to specify shallow because they make a regular version). Here are reaches and drops for several bars as posted at bikeusa:

Ritchey Pro/WCS 82/144, Salsa Short & Shallow 82/144, Cinelli Solida 90/145, Deda 215 Shallow 81/132, Deda 215 Regular 87/139.

According to these numbers, Deda has the shortest reach of any. The Salsa Poco is also shorter, but I didn't get the numbers for it.
Reach and dropNessism
Dec 11, 2003 9:32 AM
Reach and drop is measured differently by different manufactuers: some measure center to center and others measure outside to outside. Sounds like bikeusa is trying to level the playing field by listing all bars as measuring center to center so the dimensions can be compared. To convert these dimensions to O-O, just add 26 mm.

As far as the original question goes, Deda has some ad copy they put in magazines that state that when in the drops, their anotomic bars allow an easier reach to the levers. They even quantify the shorter reach. This claim has nothing to do with the standard bar reach dimension so keep this in mind.

Ed