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Used Wheelsets???(3 posts)

Used Wheelsets???ZGdoc
May 15, 2003 9:08 PM
I am building up an old frame and was considering buying a used wheelset. Is this a bad idea? What things should I look out for (i.e. how many miles are too many, are raced on wheels bad news, etc...)? I am tring to keep costs down yet get a decent wheelset. Thanks for any input.
re: Used Wheelsets???maximum15
May 16, 2003 8:27 AM
I have a front wheel with tire that you can have for cost of shipping and effort to ship it. E-mail me at maximum15@earthlink.net if interested.
re: Used Wheelsets???Spoke Wrench
May 16, 2003 8:45 AM
I'd pretty much stick with Shimano or Campy hubs. They're reliable. Other hubs, even some of the real high end stuff, can have uncommon bearings and unreliable freehub mechanisms.

First check the rear hub's "over locknut dimension." That's the width of the hub between the locknuts. It needs to match your frame.

Second: Cassette or freewheel? Campy or Shimano? 7 speed or 8/9 speed? It needs to match the rest of the components you are using. While it's often possible to make non-matching parts work together, you may also wind up spending more than a new, matching wheel might cost. You'll be unplesantly surprised at how much axle sets and cassette spacers can cost.

Put the wheel in a bike or in a trueing stand and give it a spin. It should be true both side to side and up and down.

Squeeze parallel pairs of spokes together all the way around the wheel. They should all feel about the same degree of tightness. If they don't, even if the wheel looked true, take a pass. That's a sign the rim has been permanently bent and was forceable pulled back into line by tightning selected spokes. Other bad signs are obviously mis-matched spokes and spokes that have be mangled by the chain.

If the brakeing surface of the rim feels convex (common on mountain bikes but rare on road bikes), that rim has outlived it's carefree days.

Finally, spin the axle with your fingers. Smooth is good.

Good luck. You're going to find that it's much easier to find a useable front wheel than it is to find a rear.