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Sealed hub wheel bearing removal question(5 posts)

Sealed hub wheel bearing removal questionShad
Oct 24, 2002 11:47 AM
I'm working on a girlfriend's bike (another girlfriend, another bike to overhaul!), circa 1987, and it has sealed cartridge bearings in the hubs rather than loose. I've replaced and re-packed loose bearings many times but never the sealed style. I know that the entire cartridge is replaced, but I'm wondering how I actually remove them. I found the tool pictured below at biketoolsetc, but don't really understand how it works, and if it is even the proper tool. Also, do the replacement bearing cartridges need to be installed with a special press or can I just match the size and shove the new ones in there? I've searched this topic, but couldn't find much info on this site or the Park tool site.

Any advice, links or tips are greatly appreciated from all you maintenance gurus on this site.

Thanks, Shad in MN
re: Sealed hub wheel bearing removal questionC-40
Oct 24, 2002 2:28 PM
First remove the axle. The tool is then inserted into the bearing bore. The small flanges catch the inner surface of the bearing and allow it to be pulled out.

A long screwdriver may also be use to drive out a cartridge bearing from the opposite side. It will probably damage the bearing, but you don't care if it's going to be replaced with a new one.

If you're lucky, the bearings will have a model number (like 6000) stamped somewhere on the outer face. If not, you'll need to measure the diameter of the cartridge, the thickness and the bore diameter, before you can order new bearings. Bike hubs nearly always use standard bearings. Look for ABEC-1 tolerance bearings with double seals.

Installing new bearing must be done carefully. Most bearings are a light press fit in the hub. A press would be nice if you have access to one, but the bearings can be tapped into place with a hammer, it you place a wood block over the bearing to insure that pressure is applied to the outer edge of the bearing cartridge, not the inner race (with the hole for the axle).

This website has bearing info.
http://www.e-bearings.cc/singl.htm

You can purchase bearings for $5-$6 each from mcmaster.com. Search under bearings. Good Luck.
re: cheapest bearing press = old bearingThirtyFive
Oct 24, 2002 5:20 PM
sometimes the wood block method does not allow you to press the bearing all the way in if the bearing is recessed. place the old bearing on top of the new bearing so that you hit the old bearing. the old bearing will take the brunt and will press the new bearing in. perfect fit everytime...
Bearing replacementNessism
Oct 24, 2002 5:33 PM
One trick I've learned is to heat up the aluminum using a heat gun or small torch to expand the bearing cavity, the bearing can often be just tapped out thereafter. When installing the new bearings, place them in the freezer beforehand to shrink them down some. Many times they will just fall into the bearing cavity. If not, heat the shell again a little to expand it.

Of course this trick does not always work but in most cases it will ease installation.

Ed
Cool! Thanks Guys! nmShad
Oct 25, 2002 6:36 AM