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Rider weight vs wheel durability(12 posts)

Rider weight vs wheel durabilityMethyl
Oct 21, 2002 2:29 PM
I recently inherited a c'dale R-1000 caad7 with ksyrium elite wheels. I am 6'3" 230lbs and have been told that i am too much of a satchel-ass for these wheels. I only ride on smooth trails. Any help?
Thanks
IMO, you (and I) are out of the target demoSilverback
Oct 21, 2002 3:51 PM
I dunno, man...I don't have any experience with those, and they do have a good reputation. But that's not many spokes (18 and 20, right?) for guys like us. I've had trouble every time I've tried to go below 32 spokes, and ALWAYS with alloy nipples. But I do go on dirt roads a little, unavoidably, as part of some favorite training routes.
Rider dependentKerry
Oct 21, 2002 4:17 PM
And I'm not talking about weight. I know fairly light riders who trash wheel after wheel, while their much heavier companions never have problems. There is such a thing as "riding light" - avoiding potholes, lifting out of the saddle for any obstacle, etc. If you do that and ride smooth roads, you likely will not have any problems with these wheels. Anyhow, you've got the wheels now, so you might as well ride them - they're not going to collapse under you. If they don't hold up for you, then get something more sturdy when the time comes.
re: Rider weight vs wheel durabilitydstahl
Oct 22, 2002 5:54 AM
The wheels will hold up fine. I have a set of Rolf Vectors and Ksyrium SL and weigh over 200lbs. Both sets have over 2000 miles on them and they are as true as they were when they were new.
No need to worry at allEager Beagle
Oct 22, 2002 6:57 AM
I have those, and Classic Elites. I am 210+ and ride on truely awful roads, all of the time.

Both sets of wheels have stood up without any problems at all - not even a true until some woman drove into me. Even then, they were fine after a tweak and no more problems.
6'7" 265lbsPaulCL
Oct 22, 2002 9:31 AM
Not me, but an acquaintance of mine. He's been riding the same K's for about 2 1/2 years without a single problem. He puts about 5000+ miles a year on 'em.
It's a matter of confidence ...SingleThreaded
Oct 22, 2002 1:27 PM
Eventually at your size you'll trash those wheels and any sub-30 spoke wheel unless you monitor it and maintain it properly. The trick is watching for signs that it may be going. You don't want to get caught too far from home when one spoke or nipple breaks because the wheel to become useless. Not only that, but continued riding stresses the other spokes and nipples which won't fail until later rides.

I've found that the low spoke wheels stay perfectly true during normal operation. But once they showing any deflection attend to it because at you weight the unbalanced stress exagerate the effect and you can't expect the weak link to expose itself within 10-50 miles.

There's no reason you can't get over 5K out of these wheels, but I would expect a rebuild or three along the way.
It's a matter of confidence ...SingleThreaded
Oct 22, 2002 1:29 PM
Eventually at your size you'll trash those wheels and any sub-30 spoke wheel unless you monitor it and maintain it properly. The trick is watching for signs that it may be going. You don't want to get caught too far from home when one spoke or nipple breaks causing the wheel to become useless. Not only that, but continued riding stresses the other spokes and nipples which won't fail until later rides.

I've found that the low spoke wheels stay perfectly true during normal operation. But once they showing any deflection attend to it because at your weight the unbalanced stresses exagerate the effect and you can expect the weak link to expose itself within 10-50 miles.

There's no reason you can't get over 5K out of these wheels, but I would expect a rebuild or three along the way.
Wuups... the ol' Back One Page - Edit -- Stutter (nm)SingleThreaded
Oct 22, 2002 1:31 PM
how are you going to tell?Jofa
Oct 23, 2002 11:47 AM
The hairline cracks that anticipate spoke or nipple failure are well named. They are invisible until they fail completely, after which point you can see from the (dirty) revealed surfaces that they had been 'about to go' for some time.

Trueness has nothing to do with it: if your wheels lose trueness, it is an indication not of potential failure, but of inattentive build. Uneven spoke tension results in perpetual annoyance, but the inherent stresses - from manufacture or lack of stress-relieving - that cause spokes to break, are another thing entirely.

To the original poster- Mavic are a big company and they aren't going to risk a safety margin which excludes moderately sized riders like you. Many people are vastly heavier. Your wheels will be as fine as anybody else's.

Jofa
re: how are you going to tell?SingleThreaded
Oct 23, 2002 1:23 PM
Trueness may show an inattentive build, but lack of trueness can provide an indication of potential failure. Hairline cracks are influenced by stresses. Most of the nipples and spokes that I've snapped have had clean breaks but you can see that shearing was taking place prior. These don't just happen instantaneous.

Whether it's an inattentive build or a failing component, any wheel is going to come out of true. Heavier riders will influence how quickly and how drastically these wheels will fail.
re: Rider weight vs wheel durabilityMethyl
Oct 22, 2002 2:53 PM
Thanks for your help everyone! I am new to this forum and it is great to have so many knowledgeable people here

Thanks again