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Sell Whole or Part Out?(10 posts)

Sell Whole or Part Out?hirevR
Sep 25, 2002 7:55 AM
I've taken some good advice and i am going to sell my bike (see recent thread in general if confused).

My question is whether I would do better selling the complete bike or parting everything out?

Specs:
2001 Med Giant TCR0 (built in 2002 with new parts)
Giant Bladed All-Carbon Fork
Cane creek integrated hs
Mike Burrowes 3 Carbon Aero post
Selle Italia SLR
(above would be the frame package if sep.)
Full Ultegra 2002 everything else
Rolf Vector Pros
Vittoria Ultra Speeds
Look 396 (black)
12-23 cassette
ITM Millenium 90mm stem
Easton EC 90 (42)bars
new cinelli cork tape
elite gel cages

everything has less than 500 miles on it.
which would be a better idea?
if interested, watch for it in the classy's soon!
500 miles?filtersweep
Sep 25, 2002 6:04 PM
I'll speak out of both sides of my mouth...

If you part it out, you will contend with a high "pain in the A$$ factor" of having to track multiple buyers, package and ship to multiple addresses, etc... theoretically, most bikes above 105 without a bunch of mystery OEM parts are worth more than the sum of their parts if NEW- however, you'll likely need to find a brave buyer of used carbon bars (as one example) and a buyer is usually more "tolerant" of signs of use equally distributed across an entire bike vs. signs of use on individual parts. Buyers may be wary of whether your parts indeed have only 500 miles on them.

Parts purchased piecemeal over the internet through retailers or ebay can be purchased very cheaply, and will affect your asking price- you'll be entering a market trolled by bottom-feeders and low-ballers.

You'll need to find a buyer specifically interested in your stem rather than a whole bike buyer who may or may not exactly want that stem, but it won't be a deal breaker. You'll basically write off your bar tape and cages (who buys those used? the shipping would scare most buyers away). Your tires? If you bundle them with the wheels they won't be worth much extra either.

I'd find a comfortable reserve, put it up on ebay. It might be late in the season... I recently sold a one year old bike for almost what it would cost NEW on closeout. Ebay is a strange place. Selling as a whole bike provides the buyer with the immediate gratification and can enhance the value (can be more than the sum of its parts) OR- if you can salvage the components, sell just the frameset and keep everything else (probably your best option financially).
Well put and very well taken....hirevR
Sep 25, 2002 6:24 PM
...looks like i'll be tossing up the whole bike or just the frameset. What a crossroads, but i'll manage if this is the most difficult of decisions I face today.
Thanks!
Isn't that what ebuy is all about...enclavecat
Sep 25, 2002 7:12 PM
bottom-feeders and low-ballers. after all it is an aucton site not a who-can-impress-who-with-a-higher-bid-because-paying-retail-is-not-enough-for-me-I-like-the-convenience-of-getting-screwed-online site...or is it???
Well...filtersweep
Sep 26, 2002 3:57 AM
I think there is a difference between the bottom-feeding low-baller mentality and the realities generally associated with actually "WINNING" and auction- most lowballers never win ...there is also the inherent form of competition. Most bidders ignore the proxy principle and start with a ridiculously low bid and manually inch upwards. It's like slowly boiling a lobster. The psychology is like they are only in for X-amount of money, even after the bidding has moved up to Y-amount. Then there is the slowly unfolding THEATER of the auction itself- since the purchase is not IMMEDIATE, a bidder can be easily motivated to bid higher on an item near the end of the auction so he/she doesn't need to wait another WEEK to "win" the auction... and then there is the issue of "winning" an item- WINNING?! Like someone made off with a freebie...
Part out you will get more $$$PeterRider
Sep 26, 2002 10:36 AM
... well, it worked for me this way:
I got a used Trek Yfoil in the spring, with an extra set of wheels. The frame was a bit small, so I sold (separately) frameset, headset ,2sets of wheels, pedals. Deducting ebay seller's fees, I got about 100$ less than what I paid for the bike. So I got the whole Ultegra group, bars, seat&seatpost, tires, for about 100$. Didn't sell anything at an outrageous price, and I used the bike for about 1500 miles. Was a nice bike.

The only thing, as has been already mentioned, is that it is annoying to take the bike apart, list different sales, track buyers. I did it because I wanted to keep the components.

Pierre
Part out you will get more $$$rbb
Sep 26, 2002 11:21 AM
I've got to agree with the above post! I bought a used corima with record 10speed off the classifieds section a few months ago for $1650 shipped. Well, I need the money now and not an extra bike so I stripped it down and just last week sold the group and nucleon wheels on eBay for $1100!! So, with that I'm a little better off and might actually be able to keep the frame(oh, so sweet!) because after the seller fees from eBay I ended up paying @$600 for a near new Corima puma frame, look carbon fork, chris king headset, corima seatpost, easton carbon bars, zep stem, Selle italia seat, and speedplay x-2 pedals! I think I will always buy used and sell parted out from now on!! Good luck.

-Bob
Watch this...filtersweep
Sep 26, 2002 1:40 PM
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1863530275

You two purchased, then parted out USED bikes, so you had a slightly different outlay of cash... I wonder what the gap would be for a new bike. Also, selling a Y-foil frameset or a Record group will definitely attract more bidders. Used wheels generally hold very good resale value for some odd reason.
yes, this is true.PeterRider
Sep 27, 2002 12:05 PM
What's your time worth?grzy
Sep 28, 2002 11:03 AM
You gotta admitt (and you do) that parting something out comes with a significant hassle factor. Pulling it appart, cleaning stuff up, listing it, answering questions, showing it, cashing individual checks, shipping, not getting the money all at once. If your time is worth, say, $20 per hour you can easily chew up the gains and not even realize it. If you're unemployed or have lots of spare time on your hands then maybe your time is only worth $0.05 per hour so suddenly the ballance changes. You're also making the assumption that you are going to sell every single item off the bike. What if no one wants the stem and bars? High end stuff is a lot easier to sell piecemeal, whereas mid to lower end stuff may move better all kept together as a package. Just look at auto junk yards as an example. Sure people make a living doing it, but is this what you want to do with your time? I have all sorts of bicycle compost that's probably worth something to somebody, but it's not worth my time to mess with it. I keep it around for when one of my buds needs something or for parts. If it's truly junk then I toss it.