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question about headsets threaded/threadless(11 posts)

question about headsets threaded/threadlessPeterRider
May 16, 2002 2:46 PM
I see so often about threaded/threadless headsets... but what is exactly that thread and what is its function, does it thread on the stem ? I mean, does a threaded headset go with a threaded stem and same for threadless ?

Also, what is better, threaded or threadless, or does it make no difference ?

Thanks,

Pierre
re: question about headsets threaded/threadlessdtjtdt
May 16, 2002 4:23 PM
Go to the Park tools wdebsite, great explanation and photos etc. I just switched to threadless a few months ago and I have to say it is superior in ease of adjustment as well as breaking it down to overhaul. I think it is better and the campy record is very smooth. (has not needed overhaul and has greaseport)
Simply put. . .czardonic
May 16, 2002 4:53 PM
. . .on a threaded headset the upper race (which sits directly on top of the bearings) threads onto the top of the fork's steerer tube. It requires the steerer tube to be threaded too (sold seperately). A lock ring sits on top of the threaded race, and a locknut is threaded over that.

A threaded headset is adjusted by tightening/loosening the threaded race. The race is then locked into place by the lockring and lock nut.

A quill type stem is inserted into the exposed steerer tube opening, and locked into place via its own mechanism.

You need fewer tools to adjust a threadless headset (usually just a single allen wrench), but the quill stem on a threaded system is much easier to adjust for height or swap out.

That Park page can be found here:
re: question about headsets threaded/threadlesstarwheel
May 17, 2002 4:27 AM
With a threaded headset, the stem has a quill that inserts into the fork steerer tube. You loosen or tighten the stem by turning the allen bolt on the top. Threaded, or quill, stems are found on most older bikes. They are the classic "L" shaped stems. The advantage to threaded stems is that you can easily adjust the height of your handlebar by loosing the stem and moving it up or down. In my view, they also look a lot nicer than threadless.

Threadless stems clamp onto the outside of the steerer tube. It is a simpler and more rigid system, and there are more options available for threadless stems in different rises and reaches. The main problem with threadless systems is that it is more difficult to adjust the height of your handlebar. Once you have cut your steerer tube, you can't raise your bars unless you install a riser stem -- which some people think looks awkward. Even with a riser stem, it is hard to raise your handlebars a whole lot with threaded systems without installing a bunch of spacers under the stem -- which also looks awkward. Plus, with forks that have carbon steerer tubes, you are not supposed to use more than 2 cm of spacers or less.

Functionally, both threaded and threadless systems are equivalent. Theoretically, a threadless system can be lighter because you can use a carbon fork with carbon steerer tube -- but this won't always work if you prefer higher handlebars. My new bike is a steel, lugged frame with a threadless system. I wanted a quill stem because I prefer the appearance and run my handlebars high (about 1" below the saddle), but it's hard to buy a new bike with a quill stem anymore. To get the proper handlebar height for me, I've had to use about 2 cm of spacers and a riser stem. I'm not crazy about the appearance, but it's functional and I've gotten used to it. I guarantee that it is heavier than an equivalent quill system because the long steel steerer tube is heavier than an aluminum quill stem.

One big advancement with threadless systems is the removeable facecap on stems. This makes it very simple to change stems, handlebars, etc. That is, you don't have to unwrap the handlebars, remove the shifters, etc., but just remove the facecap on the stem. However, there are now a number of quill stems available with removeable facecaps -- such as the Deda Murex, 3TTT Motus, Salsa SUL, Profile H2O.
re: question about headsets threaded/threadlessNoam
May 17, 2002 6:35 AM
Do not even think of getting thredless headset. This system is history and you get less and less forks and stems that go with the threaded system. Many of the fork manufacturers do not produce threaded forks anymore. Recently I broke my threaded fork had to buy the entire front of my bike which include the new threaded fork, headset, stem and handelbars. Get youself a Campy Record theadless.

Noam
Downunder Australia
ConfusedKerry
May 18, 2002 4:40 AM
Why did you have to get a new headset, stem, and handlebars. What changed? You can still buy forks with 1" threaded steerer tubes, so your stem should have dropped right in. There's more to this story than has been said.
ConfusedNoam
May 18, 2002 7:52 PM
No confusion and no more to this story. Some carbon fork manufacturers do not make threaded forks anymore particular the one that make forks with carbon stirrer. As a result of that most of the stem manufacturers such as ITM and Cinelli make very few stems that goes with threaded headset. If at any stage in the future you would like to upgrade your fork you will have to change the whole lot.

Noam
Still ConfusedKerry
May 19, 2002 5:24 AM
Since you replaced a threaded steerer fork with a threaded steerer fork, why didn't your old stem and headset work?
Still ConfusedNoam
May 19, 2002 10:48 PM
Obviosly, I have replaced a alluminium threaded fork with Ahead(threadless) Carbon fork. No rocket science here.

Noam
Still ConfusedNoam
May 19, 2002 10:51 PM
Obviously, I have replaced a alluminium threaded fork with Ahead(threadless) Carbon fork. No rocket science here.

Noam
re: question about headsets threaded/threadlessNoam
May 17, 2002 6:37 AM
Do not even think of getting threadless headset. This system is history and you get less and less forks and stems that go with the threaded system. Many of the fork manufacturers do not produce threaded forks anymore. Recently I broke my threaded fork had to buy the entire front of my bike which include the new threaded fork, headset, stem and handelbars. Get youself a Campy Record theadless.

Noam
Downunder Australia