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Need Some Help (Rolf Wheels)(8 posts)

Need Some Help (Rolf Wheels)md0426
Apr 9, 2002 6:19 AM
I have a pair of Vector Comps, about a year old. Just recently I started getting a clicking noise in the front rim. I have tried numerous things to fix it, but none have worked. I am asking for your help if any one has experienced this before, and fixed it please pass on your knowledge. Thanks
re: Need Some Help (Rolf Wheels)funknuggets
Apr 9, 2002 7:18 AM
Is there any regularity to the click where it may be a particular spoke, or is it irregular like something is loose inside the rim?

I would check your spokes and nipples, sometimes if tensioned too high, the nipple head can pop off, and click around inside the rim something fierce.
I have the same problemWhoWasThat
Apr 9, 2002 12:21 PM
Sounds like a house key clinking against the frame, but it's not. Can't find the source either. I'm running Vectors & steel frame.
Things to tryKerry
Apr 9, 2002 4:47 PM
First, we will assume that it really is the front wheel (more on this below). Three immediate things to try/check are 1) a drop of lube on each nipple where it contacts the rim, 2) a drop of lube on each spoke crossing, 3) check and lube the QR skewer.

However, you must recognize that it is fairly common to have the experience, but ticks and clicks can be very hard to eliminate. What seems like it is tied to the pedals may be coming from the seat post, etc. Sometimes things like temperature and humidity can affect noises as well. To eliminate chain ring bolts as the problem, take them all out and grease the threads, the faces where they contact the CRs, and the CRs where they contact the crank spider arms. Clicks tied to your pedaling can come from the BB (grease all threads in contact with the frame and BB, and torque it to the recommended settings, which can be quite high), the pedals (grease the threads, get some wax etc. on the cleats, grease the bolts into your shoes, squirt some lube into the guts of the pedal machinery if possible), the chain (clean and lube), your seat post and saddle (grease the post, seat post bolts, saddle rails), your bars and stem (grease the stem, stem bolt at both ends, h'bar bolt, and h'bar where it goes through the stem), and your wheels (check for spoke tension, particularly on the rear non drive side, put a drop of lube where each pair of spokes cross). Needless to say, you want to try these things in what seems like the most likely place the noise is coming from, but there are plenty of stories about "I was sure the noise was in the handlebars but it went away when I tightened up the spokes in the rear wheel," so keep trying different things until you have success.
Good list!dzrider
Apr 10, 2002 10:46 AM
It's also reassuring for a half-fast home mechanic to hear that others suffer the same noises. I try to lessen the frustration of the search by viewing the greasing as an ounce of prevention for bonded seat posts and the like.

I once did everything on your list only to find the noise came from loose nuts in my shoes that were meant to hold some other kind of cleats than the kind I was using.
re: Need Some Help (Rolf Wheels)the bird
Apr 9, 2002 4:52 PM
been there done that,got the t shirt annnd the hat!!! Try putting a little grease between the mateing surface where the front hub and fork dropout get squeezed together when the skewer is closed. Include the skewer and that little spring thing to.My 5200 cracked like a whip when climbing out of the saddle till I figured this out!
re: Need Some Help (Rolf Wheels)ciclista
Apr 10, 2002 5:33 AM
Replace alum axle caps with steel ones grease them when installing then they will finally be silenced!
New tube?Crankist
Apr 11, 2002 12:03 PM
If you've recently replaced the tube with a different brand you may find that the sound is the metal stem tapping the clearance hole sides. I had this problem (drove me freakin' NUTS!). Cured it with a short section of drinking straw slipped over the botttom of the stem. You may have to slit the straw.
Mike