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GEAR RATIO_iNCHES STUFF(11 posts)

GEAR RATIO_iNCHES STUFF3SPRINTER
Jan 27, 2002 6:25 AM
Hello everyone.I am new to road biking.....got a principia frame, but i wana know more abt the gears stuff...12/27...39/53..stuff like tt.

Firstly, how do i choose wats right combination 4 me,both cassette and chainring?
How much of a diff does one tooth actually make?
\
BAsically...terrain here not so hilly...but i might be riding occasional short and long hills...THANX!!!!!
not hilly?hammermaster
Jan 27, 2002 6:51 AM
then get 42-53 rings, and 11-19 straightblock
not hilly?but...ALLROUNDER TERRAIN3SPRINTER
Jan 27, 2002 6:59 AM
okok....consider my terrain an all rounded one...what would an all round terrain kind of racer require
Just do it and the answer will come.nee Spoke Wrench
Jan 27, 2002 7:46 AM
Basically, most people want the narrowest gear range that will allow them to comfortably handle whatever local hills they ride. Narrow gears are good because they allow you to find a gear in the "sweet spot" where you are neither peddling too fast nor straining to turn the cranks.

So what's the narrowest range that will work for you? Just ride for a while. Look to see what other riders in your area are using, but remember, your bicycle only has to make you happy. What works wonderfully for someone else might not be for you.
re: GEAR RATIO_iNCHES STUFFChen2
Jan 27, 2002 7:52 PM
If you don't have much experience with road gears, and you're not really too heavy, I'd say get a 52-39 double crank set and 12-25 cassette. But that's just a guess, and if you really get interested in gearing you'll want to experiment, especially with cassettes.
-Al
re: GEAR RATIO_iNCHES STUFF3SPRINTER
Jan 28, 2002 2:58 AM
well basically...i am 132 pounds...5foot6
re: GEAR RATIO_iNCHES STUFFChen2
Jan 28, 2002 6:48 AM
Wow, I'm envious. If you are in really good shape you can probably use a more aggressive cassette than what I suggested before, maybe try a 12-23, and for serious racing 12-21 or 11-21 if you are a big sprinter. And maybe a 53 big ring. In the end, it all depends on your abilities and the hills you need to climb. Keep in mind that for whatever you use, you should be able to spin at least 105 rpm cadence. An 11 tooth cog is a waste if you can't spin it.
-Al
re: GEAR RATIO_iNCHES STUFFschills
Jan 28, 2002 4:30 PM
As you are asking this question, then you should probably start with a 12/25 or 12/23 in the back and a 39/53 in the front. These are fairly "standard" on most new bikes. Once you have a little more experience, you can figure out what works best, or where the progression doesn't seem quite right. I went through the same thing when I started riding. Now I have a time trial bike with a 12/23 and 39/53 and another bike that I use for canyon runs and hills. . . pretty steep stuff. This bike has a 12/27 in the back and I'm now at the point where I want to swap it for a 12/25 as I don't use the 27 anymore. But for a year I used the 27 a bunch. I'd go with a 12/23 on this bike too except for one little(not so little) hill called the wall. It's so steep that I'd come to a stop if I went with 12/23 unless I tacked across it back and forth until I reached the top. It doesn't help that it come 1/2 way into the ride.

Regards,

schills
re: GEAR RATIO_iNCHES STUFFbigc
Jan 29, 2002 9:22 AM
Question:

can you change 11/23, 12/25, and 12/27 cassettes interchangably without adjustment?
re: GEAR RATIO_iNCHES STUFFschills
Jan 29, 2002 11:13 AM
Yup. For the most part you can.
re: GEAR RATIO_iNCHES STUFFbigc
Jan 31, 2002 11:00 AM
let me clarify my interchangable question:

i'm running campy chorus 10. my understanding is that campy comes with a 11/23, 12/25, 13/26, and 13/29. only shimano has the 12/27 option and the 13/29 option will require a rear deraileur swap to medium.

i'm running a 11/23 cassette, but can't seem to get the needed rpm's for training so i want to swap it out with something that will help me tick em over a bit more...