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Durability of Dura-ace(10 posts)

Durability of Dura-aceJ_Bravo
Jan 22, 2002 9:35 PM
What is the lifespan of dura-ace group? I am looking into buying a used bike that has an old dura-ace groupo on it (bought in 2000). The owner says the the group has close to 5,000 miles on it, and the bike is online so I won't be able to test it. Are there any perticular questions I should ask? Is it possible that the group is still in good working order?

Thanks for your help,
John
careful unless it is a great dealspookyload
Jan 22, 2002 11:12 PM
You could find problems in the drive train mostly. If it has 5000 miles on it, you will definately need new chainrings($80), new cassette($70), new chain($30), and likely new tires($80). This is assuming none of this was replaced. Other things that might require replacing are the rear deraileur pulleys($40), and cables($20). But if some or all of these have been replaced recently, you might be ok. If not, you could be incurring$300+ worth of replacement parts upon purchase. Try to get that factored into the price.
careful unless it is a great dealgwilliams
Jan 23, 2002 6:27 AM
I don't see any reason why you would have to replace the chainrings at 5000 miles. I have 6000 miles on my Dura-Ace group and have only replaced the chain. I expect to get thousands of more miles on the chainrings before I change them. I have more than 30,000 miles on a set of Campy Super Record chainrings and the the LBS said they were still in pretty good shape.

Gary
I agreeg-money
Jan 23, 2002 7:46 AM
Road rings don't take anywhere near the abuse that mountain rings do. If the setup is correct and the owner has done his maint then the rings should be fine. It's always a bit of a gamble buying used tho. Generally, Dura Ace will last a long long time. If your getting a really good deal on the whole bike, it would be worth putting in a couple hundred to get things to snuff. Another problem altogether is whether the bike fits or not. That should be your biggest worry.
Do you just make this up?Kerry Irons
Jan 23, 2002 5:57 PM
Or do you have some experience of DA chainrings, cables, and derailleur pulleys failing in 5K miles? I don't ride DA, but I can't believe that it wears out that fast. Agree that the cassette and chain (if not changed before) are likely to need replacement. Tires have probably been replaced at least once already, but may still need new ones (Conti GP 3000 for $29 at LaBicicletta). $300 is on the super high side of reasonable costs for a bike with 5K miles. Worry about crashed frame/wheels.
I was estimating highspookyload
Jan 23, 2002 6:42 PM
I was giving a parts list based on a worst case scenario. The prices I used were what he would expect to pay from a LBS. I said replace the chaing rings simply because they are two years old. Contrary to everyones belief, chainrings do take a beating(especially the big one)not from riding, but storage, bike racks, transition areas, and the such. Dura Ace rings in particular are very soft when dealing with side blows. I didn't say he would HAVE to replace them, but if you read the post I said he MAY have to replace them. Since I don't know the person selling the bike, I can't assume the condition of the parts since I don't know how it was stored or transported. If he used a trunk rack for 2 years, I would venture to bet his chainrings are a little beat up. Dura Ace is very good in the durability, but it all depends on the care and maintenance by the owner. A chain can last 5000 miles if my ten year old is riding it, and it is well lubed. See what chain would look like after 5000 miles of riding by George Hincappi. Also when people sell bikes or anything for that matter, you could expect mileage to be fudged a little. If he put in the add that they had 10,000 miles on the parts, would he get as many responses. By all acounts, he could be getting a bike that was owned by a pro mechanic, and it will need nothing, but it would suck to get the same bike owned by a person who used one bottle of White Lightning for 5000 miles.
re: Durability of Dura-acegtx
Jan 23, 2002 10:22 AM
I'd be more worried about the frame and fork. Has it been crashed/abused? How much does this guy weigh? I'd also be wary of a used light weight bar/stem/fork combo--any of those items fails and you are meeting the pavement. I personally would never buy a used carbon fork. Properly used and maintained, DA should last a good long time--tens of thousands of miles. Maybe it will need a new cassette or chain. Of course those new cranks are very light--I might be worried if they weren't installed properly, or had been used by a large rider. Basically, you're always taking a chance when you buy used, especially sight unseen. I've bought used steel frame/forks, but nothing unltralight, and only after careful inspection.
re: Durability of Dura-aceChen2
Jan 23, 2002 1:01 PM
I've got more than 8000 on my 1998 Dura-Ace including the orignal chain. I'm going to replace the cables this year and put plan to put several more thousand miles on it. The chain rings, as others have said, are the least of your worries, with proper care they will last many years. I would be more concerned about fit and possible abuse.
-Al
The only way I would buy usedJohnT
Jan 26, 2002 6:57 PM
Is if I could actually see the stuff in person or buy it using an escrow service. Too many guys out there say the frames never been crashed and it turns out it has. Worst of all, you buy a lemon second hand and in almost all cases you have no warranty with the frames manufacturer. Properly maintained Dura Ace will last just as long as Record, it's just harder to find replacememnt parts when it does go, but how many guys actually fix broken grouppos anyway? They are usually on to another bike by then so its a non issue. I'd never buy a frame i couldn't see in person unless a personal friend was selling it.
ThanksJ_Bravo
Jan 23, 2002 10:58 PM
Thanks everyone. I feel a little better and I think I know more of the kind of questions that I should be asking.

Thanks,
John