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Crank Arm Length Question(5 posts)

Crank Arm Length QuestionTarzan
Sep 17, 2001 6:47 PM
What would be the right crank arm length for me? I'm 5'3 with a 29" inseam - and I have some irritating chondromalcia (sp?) in one of my knees. I'm thinking 165mm - at least that will have me spinning more to avoid the knee strain.
re: Crank Arm Length Questionnestorl
Sep 17, 2001 7:00 PM
You are right... 165 is the closest you will find to your optimal length. Also, 165 will help your knees, will improve your spining, and will make you more efficient. There are tons of pages dealing with this issue. This page has great links and articles about the subject. Also check the latest issue of velonews online. They have a great research article about it.

http://www.thankstomycranks.com/cranks.htm
WoW! thankstomycranks.com has educated me!Tarzan
Sep 18, 2001 12:42 AM
Yikes! Thankstomycranks.com is great reading. I was concerned that 165 would be too short. HAH! The calculator says that even 150 might not get me to the Galic Factor!! Guess I know what I'll be doing tomorrow - ordering that 165. Thanks so much!!
Be VERY careful about crank length formulasKerry Irons
Sep 18, 2001 4:59 PM
The only thing certain about crank length is that shorter cranks make it easier to spin. Many studies have been done and none of them have shown a defined relationship between crank length, leg length, and anything else. These formulas that tie crank length to some sort of leg length are based on unsubstantiated theories. Theories that sound great but actually aren't backed up by any data. However, with your sore knees, you probably will be helped by spinning, and spinning is easier with shorter cranks.
Kerry's absolutely right warning you . . .jacques
Sep 19, 2001 2:25 AM
. . . about the reams of hogwash written about crank length. Most of these armchair "studies" either hopelessly confuse the physical constants of force, power, work and torque or ignore them all together. The word "crank" seems to inspire hundreds of amateurs to dedicate their lives to this endlessly debated topic.